H&F Council Adult Social Care - Living Independently
Text size:

Assessments for care

What is a needs assessment?

A needs assessment is a meeting between you and a care professional to understand what type of support you may need to live independently.  

Requesting an assessment 

If you are finding it difficult to look after yourself and manage everyday tasks, you can contact us to discuss your care and support needs.    

The discussion will identify:  

  • if you need care and support  
  • the level of care and support you need  
  • how these could be met  
  • your family and social support networks  

If we think that your care needs can be met by simple services, we'll work with you to arrange this. For instance, if there's any equipment available to help you, such as grab handles or rails.  

If we think that you need further assessment, we might arrange for a social worker or occupational therapist to visit you to discuss your care and support needs further and advise you on the next steps.  

Contact us to request an assessment 

What to expect at your assessment  

The assessment will take place in your home. 

You can ask someone like a friend or relative to be present to support you if you want.  

We will explain the process fully at the start of the assessment.  

The aim is to get a full picture of you and what needs and goals you may have. We will talk about what’s going well and how things can be improved.  

What happens after the assessment?

If you’re assessed as needing care and support, we will agree on a care and support plan with you.

If you are not assessed as being eligible for support 

Even if you are not eligible to receive support we will give you advice and information about what support is available in the community to help you. We will also offer you advice on ways in which you can remain as independent, active and healthy as possible.   

Find services in the service directory which you can access without an assessment.  

How we decide if you are eligible for support   

Not everyone who completes an assessment will then be eligible to receive care and support from the council.  

Under the Care Act the way in which the council decides whether you are eligible is set out in regulations that set the national minimum threshold for eligibility, which will be consistent across England.   

You will have eligible needs if you meet all of the following criteria:  

  • you have care and support needs as a result of a physical or mental condition  
  • because of those needs, you cannot achieve two or more of a set of outcomes set out in the Care Act - those outcomes include things which you might expect to achieve in your day-to-day life such as dressing, maintaining personal relationships, and working or going to school.  
  • as a result of not achieving those outcomes, there is a significant impact on your wellbeing.  

How the eligibility criteria are applied and how this fits in with your assessment. 

1. Needs

The adult’s needs arise from or are related to a physical or mental impairment or illness.

2. Outcomes

As a result of the needs, the adult is unable to achieve two or more of the following:

  1. managing and maintaining nutrition;
  2. maintaining personal hygiene;
  3. managing toilet needs;
  4. being appropriately clothed;
  5. maintaining a habitable home environment;
  6. being able to make use of the home safely;
  7. developing and maintaining family or other personal relationships;
  8. accessing and engaging in work, training, education or volunteering;
  9. making use of necessary facilities or services in the local community including public transport and recreational facilities or services;
  10. carrying out any caring responsibilities the adult has for a child.

3. Wellbeing

As a consequence, there is or is likely to be a significant impact on the adult’s wellbeing,
including the following:

  1. personal dignity (including treatment of the individual with respect);
  2. physical and mental health and emotional wellbeing;
  3. protection from abuse and neglect;
  4. control by the individual over day-to-day life (including over care and support provided and the way it is provided);
  5. participation in work, education, training or recreation;
  6. social and economic wellbeing;
  7. domestic, family and personal relationships;
  8. suitability of living accommodation;
  9. the individual’s contribution to society

1. Needs

The needs arise as a consequence of providing necessary care to an adult, and the carer is ‘unable’ to
achieve the following:

2. Outcomes

As a result of the carer’s needs, either:

  1. the carer’s physical; or mental health is, or is at risk of, deteriorating, or

  2. the carer is unable to achieve any of the following outcomes:
  1. carrying out any caring responsibilities the carer has for a child;
  2. providing care to other persons for whom the carer provides care;
  3. maintaining a habitable home environment;
  4. managing and maintaining nutrition;
  5. developing and maintaining family or other significant personal relationships;
  6. accessing and engaging in work, training, education or volunteering;
  7. accessing and engaging in work, training, education or volunteering;
  8. making use of necessary facilities or services in the local community including recreational facilities or services;
  9. engaging in recreational activities.

3. Wellbeing

As a consequence, there is or is likely to be a significant impact on the carer’s wellbeing, including:

  1. personal dignity (including treatment of the individual with respect);
  2. physical and mental health and emotional wellbeing;
  3. protection from abuse and neglect;
  4. personal dignity (including treatment of the individual with respect);
  5. physical and mental health and emotional wellbeing;
  6. protection from abuse and neglect;
  7. control by the individual over day-to-day life (including over care and support provided and the way it is provided):
  8. participation in work, education, training or recreation;
  9. social and economic wellbeing;
  10. domestic, family and personal relationships;
  11. suitability of living accommodation;
  12. the individual’s contribution to society.

Planning your support 

Following the assessment, the support you may receive will depend upon your individual situation. This support may include the provision of equipment or other gadgets to help you look after yourself and stay in your home, help with going out, or help in accessing work or education.

What to do if you are refused an assessment

If you are refused an assessment and you are unhappy with our decision, you should first of all write to us formally to request an assessment, state your case, and ask us to provide written reasons as to why are not carrying out an assessment. Make we are fully aware of your situation, and give any relevant details, for example about any disabilities or health problems.  

If you are still not happy with our decision, you are entitled to make a formal complaint through our adult social care complaints procedure. 

Private and independent assessments 

You may prefer not to approach us about an assessment. A number of independent organisations and charities, as well as private individuals, can help you to carry out an assessment of your care needs, and can offer advice and guidance on the assessment process. They can also help you to arrange the best support for you once an assessment is completed. The British Association of Social Workers (BASW) can provide information about private social workers.  

Last updated: 14/06/2021